home about projects publications teaching tools
about projects writing teaching
about projects teaching writing

October 2011 Archives

Resilience.

TOKYO (AP) -- Last Sunday was the six-month anniversary of the day the massive earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan's northeast coast.

Some 20,000 people are dead or missing. More than 800,000 homes were completely or partially destroyed. The disaster crippled businesses, roads and infrastructure. The Japanese Red Cross Society estimates that 400,000 people were displaced.

Half a year later, there are physical signs of progress.

Much of the debris has been cleared away or at least organized into big piles. In the port city of Kesennuma, many of the boats carried inland by the tsunami have been removed. Most evacuees have moved out of high school gyms and into temporary shelters or apartments.

Last week the Kyodo News agency distributed an amazing group of combination photographs showing three scenes. The first scene is right after the earthquake and tsunami hit, then three months later and finally, how the scene looks now.

Modeling Personal Exposure to Fine Particulates and Carbon Monoxide from Cookstove Smoke in Rural Highlands of Guatemalan Mothers using Simple Low Cost Sensors

Northcross A, Pillarisetti A, Smith KR. Modeling Personal Exposure to Fine Particulates and Carbon Monoxide from Cookstove Smoke in Rural Highlands of Guatemalan Mothers using Simple Low Cost Sensors. In Abstracts of the 21st Annual Meeting of The International Society of Exposure Science. Baltimore, MD: Oct 23-27 2011.