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Posts tagged “london”

Review of the Breathability and Filtration Efficiency of Common Household Materials for Face Masks

Kwong LH, Wilson R, Kumar S, Crider YS, Reyes Sanchez Y, Rempel D, Pillarisetti A. Review of the Breathability and Filtration Efficiency of Common Household Materials for Face Masks. ACS Nano 2021. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.0c10146.

Current Understanding of Ultraviolet-C Decontamination of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators

Grist, S. M.; Geldert, A.; Gopal, A.; Su, A.; Balch, H. B.; Herr, A. E.; Rampazzi, S.; Smullin, S.; Starr, N.; Rempel, D.; Agarwal, P.; Altemose, N.; Chen, T.; Hu, G.; Tung, M. C.; Pillarisetti, A.; Robinowitz, D.; Shless, J. S., Current Understanding of Ultraviolet-C Decontamination of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators. Applied Biosafety 2021.

Evaluation of low-cost methods to decontaminate N95 filtering facepiece respirators in low-resource settings during the COVID-19 pandemic

With Pengbo Liu, PhD, MPH (Co-PI), Christine Moe, Danny Wilson, Ashley Styczynski, Nichole Starr, and N95Decon.

The global supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) - including surgical masks, N95 filtering facepiece respirators, gloves, and gowns - has been limited during the current pandemic. PPE serves as a first line of defense for healthcare workers and can play an important role in helping slow transmission of airborne pathogens like SARS-CoV-2. Our work focuses on two PPE-related aspects of the current pandemic. First, we will survey healthcare workers and facilities globally on their supply of PPE and usage practices. Second, we will evaluate methods of decontaminating cloth, surgical, and N95 masks that may be relevant for low-resource settings. Taken together, our findings can help optimize resource allocation and extend the use of existing supplies of PPE using decontamination methods suitable for low-resource settings.

Air Quality in London During the Olympics

Earlier this week, a few British newspapers ran stories about the implications of poor air quality in London and the impact it may have on athlete’s performance. The articles were a bit scant on details, but hinted at dangers for vulnerable populations and an increased risk of exercise-induced asthma during certain times of the day, especially for athletes. They cited London Air, a site that is tracking a number of important pollutants at sites throughout London.

They’ve got a remarkable amount of relatively easily accessible data on their site, and a special subsection catered towards visitors to London for the 2012 games. They’ve also created (in collaboration with the Environmental Health group at King’s College) free location-aware smartphone apps for Android and iOS that are impressive, easy to use, and comprehensive.

Click here to see a map of PM10 concentrations around London and visit their site for more information.

The AP story has been picked up by the Washington Post.